Archive

Posts Tagged ‘fishxpressions’

What people are saying about “Steadfast”?

January 2, 2013 1 comment

movie_poster2sm

The following are comments from the 2012 DVD release. The new version is even better!

A superb documentary! “Steadfast” not only tells the story of Joplin’s indomitable spirit after the tornado, but also resonates the faith, hope, and love that brings out the best in all of us. Hats off to you for putting it together in such a professional, entertaining, and uplifting manner! –Tim Bartow

While other writings and films about the tornado focus on events, this film focuses on people. “Steadfast” is an inspiring story in the midst of tragedy and devastation. – Jacque Gage

Absolute Blessing!!! Thank you so much for this Documentary, left there feeling HOPEFUL and UPLIFTED!!! –Michele Lucas Fry

I was very moved by this documentary and was waiting for a flood of tears and sorrow, but it was a great mix of heroes, loss, and even some much needed light-hearted moments to remember that we (Joplin) survived and are thriving despite the tragedy! –Bryan Davis

A beautiful story of hope! It’s about an ugly day in our lives, that turned into many beautiful and encouraging days of God’s works! –Linda Jarvis Teeter

I thought Greg did a wonderful job! I was a bit nervous because we haven’t really watched many videos or even looked at the books. I felt very blessed when we left and will watch the DVD again. –Sonja Hoover-Harper

Watched it all—very well done! Thank you for doing this. It is emotional, but I am glad I set aside my fear of dealing with these emotions and watched it. You should too! It will help you heal. –Jane Dye

Amazing film, Gregory Fish! Thank you for telling Joplin’s story. You did an awesome job of capturing the emotions. Thank you, again. –Deborah Morris

Most excellent!! –Pam Braxdale Harrington

Amazing! Thank you for all of your hard work! –Kristin McCarthy Perry

It was tremendous. –Elaine Francis

It was beautiful, Greg. Congratulations! –Tammy Nelson

Awesome job Greg!!! Steadfast was touching, funny and heartfelt! 5 Stars! –Pam Corwin Dudley

Steadfast, the documentary was precious, powerful, touching, moving and honoring of our town, our God and those who lost loved ones and homes. Thank you for your work, your heart, and your gifts! –Tammy Benson

Excellent job Mr. Fish! Glad I was able to be a part of the showing tonight. You really captured the tragedy and the resilience very well in a short 90 minutes. Looks like ya had a great turn out too, so that was awesome. Sleep well. Ya did good tonight, kid, real good! –Jay Tepe

Excellent Job! –Spencer Aggus

“Just attended the premiere of “Steadfast: The Documentary” and it was GREAT! Very touching and inspiring! It reminds me yet again of why I love this town and why I’m so proud of this community. I highly recommend it. Thanks, Gregory Fish, for all your hard work and congratulations on a job well done!” –Mandie Jennings

2 thumbs up and 5 stars for an awe-inspiring debut of “Steadfast, The Documentary”, which played tonight to a packed house at College Heights Christian Church in Joplin. Thank you, Greg, for using your divine talents to serve and bless so many people. –Van Benson

It was a hair-raising documentary, that left you speechless and awe struck at the devastation and the resilience of a community. –Scott McGill

The “Steadfast” documentary highlighted a God-honoring response by a community hit by one powerful tornado. –Dave Case

Just watched Steadfast. Excellent production of the May 22, 2011 tornado and aftermath. To all my friends who have been here to volunteer…you will want to see it. -Desiree Keyes Limkeman

Great job Mr. Fish!! Impressive!! –Misti Terterman Tackett

Well done, young man!! Well done!!! –Jim Cruzan

A great story. Very well presented! –Elizabeth Robertson

Proud doesn’t even begin to describe how I feel about my little brother and the work he did on this documentary. I had seen over half of it, but he wrapped it up beautifully and I was moved to tears along with hundreds of other people that watched Joplin’s story unfold before our eyes. Good job, Gregory Fish! –Charissa Robinett

Excellent documentary on the Joplin tornado: uplifting, inspiring, with moments of levity, and seriousness. Good job, Gregory Fish! –David Fish

It was beautifully done! I know there are so many of us that will never be the same because of the tornado and all that we went through. Greg did a wonderful job of capturing the experience of the tornado. We are all forever changed for the better. Experiences like the tornado are never easy but sometimes through painful times we really grow. Thank you for all your hard work and for sharing the film with us! –Christine Segal

Thank you for telling Joplin’s story– a story of hope, of faith, of God! The only way we can make it through and will continue to live and move and have our being is in Him! –Pamela Praytor

You did an outstanding job, Greg! Thanks for all your hard work. -Gary & Randa Reed

Steadfast is a tool that should be in the library of all grief counselors! -Lance Hostetter

Advertisements

New Documentary Trailer

I’ve been hard at work, shooting, editing, conceptualizing, editing, and editing. I’m almost done with the Documentary. The end is in sight. So granted, it was time for a new trailer. Here it is. As it says in the trailer, the release date is set for November 19. That will be right at one and a half years since the tornado. Actually, the 22nd is the precise day, but that’s Thanksgiving. I will be thankful to have completed this massive undertaking, but it has been a privilege to document such amazing stories. I hope the end result is a blessing. Here’s the new trailer:

[vimeo 50940321]

Remixing The Choir

I’ve been a long time The Choir fan. Not too long ago I brought Steve and Derri down to do an acoustic show at the church I was serving at in Texas. So of course, I pre-ordered the newest album “The Loudest Sound Ever Heard” along with the stems for remixing. I decided to remix “Cross that River” and change it up pretty dramatically. I got my ukulele out and re-programmed some drums and turned it into “cross da river, man!”. Then I thought about some camping footage I took with my GoPro and decided to spend my Memorial Day morning editing in some ukulele footage and making a video for the remix. Here’s what I came up with:

Thinking Outside

December 5, 2011 Leave a comment

Download the pdf of this post from Christian Video Magazine- here.

This last mini-movie I made was a beast to edit…and I mean that quite literally. It is about the greatest of beasts which draws its inspiration from an obscure passage in Revelation. Here are some helpful little revelations about the creative process that I gleaned through my experience with this project, which by the way can be found at http://www.worshiphousemedia.com/mini-movies/26526/The-Red-Dragon-Of-Christmas:

Let this video help you to tell the Christmas story in a new but a very Biblical way.

(4-page Leader’s Guide PDF included!)

1) Think Outside the Manger

You thought I’d say “box”, but that would be cliche, and therefore not “outside-the-box” thinking. When it comes to creating a Christmas illustration, we need to think outside the manger. In other words, do something that hasn’t been done already a million times over. A creative person scraping the bottom of the barrel, recycling old, used ideas just isn’t attractive. I know, I know. There’s nothing new under the sun. However, we can present a new/ old idea in a new way. Or we can bring to light something that is new to most people. It’s like when I talk about my new camera lens, it’s not actually new; it’s slightly used, but it’s new to me.

This video has been a long time coming. I taught a class on Revelation at church and actually preached on the Red Dragon of Christmas last year. It’s taken me all of this time to muster the courage to piece together this video and companion leader’s guide. Why courage? There’s a risk in creating something that is different. How will it be received? I don’t know. But we will see. As a pastor, I know what it’s like to come to Christmas every year and wonder how I’m going to bring something fresh this time. The Red Dragon of Christmas certainly would be something that many never would have even considered, but will others now take the risk in showing this video and building their message around this obscure passage? Many pastors are even afraid to get into the book of Revelation beyond chapter three. These types of questions are always on the back of your mind as a creator, but is the unknowing a deal breaker? It is not. You won’t know until you publish. If you ship it off you’ll find out the answer. If you don’t, you’ll never know. So, create something plain and safe, or go outside of your comfort zone to bring a potentially great and impacting creation from conception to follow through all the way to completion. More on this later.

2) Bring in Outside Help

When making something that was a big idea in your mind, you may have to venture outside of yourself to execute that idea effectively. The vision may be larger than your ability to accomplish on your own. That’s is absolutely fine. Bring in outside help. Nobody can be an expert or even decent at everything. John Dickson does a great job in his book Humilitas of defining humility in part as common sense. In that chapter he tells a joke:

There was a plane, and the pilot comes across the radio and says “Attention all passengers. I have some bad news. We are going to crash.” Now, there were three others on board this aircraft, four including the pilot. The pilot says, “The good news is, there are parachutes. The bad news is there are only three. This is my plane, I’m the pilot, and I’m going to take one.” So he straps on a parachute and out he jumps. Now, remaining on board was a brilliant professor, a minister of religion, and a backpacker, with only two parachutes. The brilliant professor jumps up and says, “I’m a brilliant professor; I have lots to achieve in this world; I can create and donate to mankind; I need a parachute.” He straps one on and jumps out of the plane. Left behind is the minister of religion and the backpacker. The minister turns to the backpacker and said, “Look, I’ve had a long life; I’ve enjoyed my life; I know where I’m going. You take the final parachute.” The backpacker stops him and says, “No, wait. That brilliant professor, he just jumped out with my backpack.” While the story is not true, it clearly demonstrates how expertise in one area counts for little in another.

So as Dickson illustrates, while I may be OK at animating, I’m not very good at drawing. Here I needed some original dragon art that I could use and animate, but Illustrator is a program that I hardly ever use! It’s time to phone a friend. Actually I Facebooked him (if that’s a verb). I later went through and explained the crazy concept. Though we live in different states, we were able to collaborate on this project. Without him, I wouldn’t have original dragon art. And if the title is “The Red Dragon of Christmas” I probably need some dragon in the video.

That’s not where the collaborating ended. If you’re a one man team like me, then you are easily tempted to do everything yourself. That way you have more control over it, and you get it the way you want it. That’s all fine and well. More power to you, but know that maybe, just maybe, quite possibly, actually, it could be better if you brought in outside help. This particular had an enormous menacing voice-over. If you look at my videos, you’ll find that I do most of my own voice-overs. It’s easier that way. No need to bother anyone else. On this one, I broke down and said to myself that I should find someone else. The first person I had in mind was a personal friend who is a professional radio voice. Though he too lives in another state, these days that doesn’t mean you can’t collaborate. He did a fabulous job. Only had to fix one pronunciation, and I was ready to build a score around his wonderful narration.
3) Expect Resistance from the Outside
I have my original dragon art. I have my audio done. I’m looking at the calendar. I set a deadline for myself. I get the weekend that I’m supposed to use to piece this thing together. All is ready to go…except for me. The moment I’ve been planning for a year has arrived. I’ve blocked out many other activities to dedicate this time for editing, something I love to do, and yet I want to do anything else but this. Fear is creeping in. Is anyone going to be bold enough to use this? Will they even like it? I don’t know how to create a fire effect or smoke. Will people think this is tacky? Why is a public domain picture of Athaliah so hard to find? All of this is called resistance.

If you haven’t watched my dragon video yet, let me give you the cliff-notes right now. (If you want to go a lot more in depth, it packs a lot of info, and I give you even more in the 4 page pdf that comes with the download.) The video is about the missing piece in our nativity scenes. Not the angels, or shepherds, wise men, or even Joseph. According to Revelation 12 a large Red Dragon was present there in Bethlehem, trying to destroy the child. This is something he been trying to do ever since Genesis 3. He is identified as Satan, the ancient serpent in verse 9. The video chronicles many times throughout scripture that he attempts to undo God’s promise, but is unsuccessful.

I am making a video about our enemy, exposing him for what he is. My wife told me that he probably didn’t want me making this video. That was some of the push-back, the wanting to give up, the self-doubting, the procrastination. In Gary Molander’s new book (I interviewed him in the last edition) he has a section on creative blocks and resistance. On pgs 80-82 he gives it a name. Satan. Interestingly enough, he even quotes Revelation 12, the very passage I was to be animating. Gary writes, “The most important line is the last one – the one that says that Satan is coming after Christ-followers with a rage and with vengeance. You hurt a Father most by harming His children.” I tweeted Gary and he and others actually prayed for me that day. In two days of hard work, the video was done. If you expect resistance, you can counter it. In your next project think “outside”.

We are all Liars

We are all liars to some degree. We may have a good handle on being honest and not speaking lies to others, but we lie to ourselves more than we know. Sin nature’s good about that. There’s a reason our enemy is called Deceiver and the Father of Lies, it’s his oldest trick. Instead we should listen for truth. It may come in a still small voice, so you can’t be distracted by all the noise if you want to be attuned to it . The truth definitely in God’s word. You can trust what he says more so than what you are saying to yourself, because remember we all lie from time to time. That’s what my new video is about:

http://www.worshiphousemedia.com/mini-movies/24958/You-Saygod-Says

 

Jacob Mann on 7D, rigs, filmmaking

For this month’s article, I thought it’d be nice to interview an expert in the field. Jacob Mann was a good friend of mine growing up and now freelances for a living. I wanted to pick his brain a little, so why not come along with me as we explore the world of freelance video with Jacob Mann.

GF: Jacob, I’d like to welcome you to the Toolkit. You and I go way back. We both were missionary kids in Chile. We went to the same school. We had similar interests in music and basketball even. I never would’ve thought back then that we’d both be into video production now. How is it that you first got interested in this field?

JM: Well, I was always exposed to the broadcast side of things. Growing up as missionary kid, I was always around radio broadcast, as the ministry began
growing, they started adding live sound for concerts, lighting, and video. So being the Pastor’s kid, I was always there at every function. My buddy Job Alonso was always shooting fun little videos and movies, and then editing them old school style using VCRs. He actually really got me excited about it. With the
ministry side of it, and shooting skate videos with Job, then fast-forwarding a few years later I realized that I’m somewhat good at this, I like it, and I can
make money doing it. So why not!

[read more]

(Get a free subscription to Christian Video Mag and access to the archives and a flash viewer at www.christianvideomag.com)

Father’s Day Media

I wanted to create a new illustration for this Father’s day that was cinematic on DSLR, but since the Joplin Tornado happened, I’m going to have to save it for next year. So here’s some older Father’s day media that I have available:

This countdown was popular last year: http://www.worshiphousemedia.com/countdowns/19235/Crazy-Things-Dads-Say-Countdown

This illustration is from several years ago (also available en español)

http://sermonspice.com/product/17072/time-a-fathers-gift

http://sermonspice.com/product/17077/ilustraci%C3%83%C2%B3n-tiempo-un-regalo-de-un-padre – Spanish Version

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY!

%d bloggers like this: