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Worship 1/2 (revised)

September 18, 2017 Leave a comment

Years ago I made a though-provoking video to get Christians (myself included) to think more about the words we sing, and ask if it lines up with the lives we live. The resulting video was a fake infomercial for a worship CD full of satirical lyrics. Some may say it’s borderline sacrilegious, but I would disagree and say it’s purposeful to start a conversation. Recently I remade it, since the old one wasn’t even HD. Below is the result of the remake, as well as the older version. It’s also kind of fun to point out that my wife helped me with the first one (it’s not easy or even possible to film yourself!) and my son helped with the new one. Here’s to no more half-heartead devotion!

 

The older version:

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Great is Thy Faithfulness

My sister is getting married today. I’m excited for her! God IS faithful.

I’ll be playing this song at the wedding while her friend sings it. It’s a great hymn! A classic.

Here’s a little video I shot over a lunch break to show her friend the arrangement. I think sometime in the future I might want to do another home studio recording of an album or EP of pure hymns.

Jesus, Friend of Sinners

“Break our hearts for what breaks Yours”

This is a video I put together for GNPI before being hired. Since joining the team, we’ve acquired a license to stream the music video. If you like Casting Crowns, be sure to check out our version of “Jesus, Friend of Sinners.” If you like it or if it convicts you in any way, please share it with your friends.

What is New Liturgy?

Here’s a great discussion I had with Stephen Proctor and Aaron Niequist about their New Liturgy collaboration. Watch the vimeo video mentioned in the conversation here: https://vimeo.com/56877843

(Interview as seen on Christian Media Magazine)

Thinking Outside

December 5, 2011 Leave a comment

Download the pdf of this post from Christian Video Magazine- here.

This last mini-movie I made was a beast to edit…and I mean that quite literally. It is about the greatest of beasts which draws its inspiration from an obscure passage in Revelation. Here are some helpful little revelations about the creative process that I gleaned through my experience with this project, which by the way can be found at http://www.worshiphousemedia.com/mini-movies/26526/The-Red-Dragon-Of-Christmas:

Let this video help you to tell the Christmas story in a new but a very Biblical way.

(4-page Leader’s Guide PDF included!)

1) Think Outside the Manger

You thought I’d say “box”, but that would be cliche, and therefore not “outside-the-box” thinking. When it comes to creating a Christmas illustration, we need to think outside the manger. In other words, do something that hasn’t been done already a million times over. A creative person scraping the bottom of the barrel, recycling old, used ideas just isn’t attractive. I know, I know. There’s nothing new under the sun. However, we can present a new/ old idea in a new way. Or we can bring to light something that is new to most people. It’s like when I talk about my new camera lens, it’s not actually new; it’s slightly used, but it’s new to me.

This video has been a long time coming. I taught a class on Revelation at church and actually preached on the Red Dragon of Christmas last year. It’s taken me all of this time to muster the courage to piece together this video and companion leader’s guide. Why courage? There’s a risk in creating something that is different. How will it be received? I don’t know. But we will see. As a pastor, I know what it’s like to come to Christmas every year and wonder how I’m going to bring something fresh this time. The Red Dragon of Christmas certainly would be something that many never would have even considered, but will others now take the risk in showing this video and building their message around this obscure passage? Many pastors are even afraid to get into the book of Revelation beyond chapter three. These types of questions are always on the back of your mind as a creator, but is the unknowing a deal breaker? It is not. You won’t know until you publish. If you ship it off you’ll find out the answer. If you don’t, you’ll never know. So, create something plain and safe, or go outside of your comfort zone to bring a potentially great and impacting creation from conception to follow through all the way to completion. More on this later.

2) Bring in Outside Help

When making something that was a big idea in your mind, you may have to venture outside of yourself to execute that idea effectively. The vision may be larger than your ability to accomplish on your own. That’s is absolutely fine. Bring in outside help. Nobody can be an expert or even decent at everything. John Dickson does a great job in his book Humilitas of defining humility in part as common sense. In that chapter he tells a joke:

There was a plane, and the pilot comes across the radio and says “Attention all passengers. I have some bad news. We are going to crash.” Now, there were three others on board this aircraft, four including the pilot. The pilot says, “The good news is, there are parachutes. The bad news is there are only three. This is my plane, I’m the pilot, and I’m going to take one.” So he straps on a parachute and out he jumps. Now, remaining on board was a brilliant professor, a minister of religion, and a backpacker, with only two parachutes. The brilliant professor jumps up and says, “I’m a brilliant professor; I have lots to achieve in this world; I can create and donate to mankind; I need a parachute.” He straps one on and jumps out of the plane. Left behind is the minister of religion and the backpacker. The minister turns to the backpacker and said, “Look, I’ve had a long life; I’ve enjoyed my life; I know where I’m going. You take the final parachute.” The backpacker stops him and says, “No, wait. That brilliant professor, he just jumped out with my backpack.” While the story is not true, it clearly demonstrates how expertise in one area counts for little in another.

So as Dickson illustrates, while I may be OK at animating, I’m not very good at drawing. Here I needed some original dragon art that I could use and animate, but Illustrator is a program that I hardly ever use! It’s time to phone a friend. Actually I Facebooked him (if that’s a verb). I later went through and explained the crazy concept. Though we live in different states, we were able to collaborate on this project. Without him, I wouldn’t have original dragon art. And if the title is “The Red Dragon of Christmas” I probably need some dragon in the video.

That’s not where the collaborating ended. If you’re a one man team like me, then you are easily tempted to do everything yourself. That way you have more control over it, and you get it the way you want it. That’s all fine and well. More power to you, but know that maybe, just maybe, quite possibly, actually, it could be better if you brought in outside help. This particular had an enormous menacing voice-over. If you look at my videos, you’ll find that I do most of my own voice-overs. It’s easier that way. No need to bother anyone else. On this one, I broke down and said to myself that I should find someone else. The first person I had in mind was a personal friend who is a professional radio voice. Though he too lives in another state, these days that doesn’t mean you can’t collaborate. He did a fabulous job. Only had to fix one pronunciation, and I was ready to build a score around his wonderful narration.
3) Expect Resistance from the Outside
I have my original dragon art. I have my audio done. I’m looking at the calendar. I set a deadline for myself. I get the weekend that I’m supposed to use to piece this thing together. All is ready to go…except for me. The moment I’ve been planning for a year has arrived. I’ve blocked out many other activities to dedicate this time for editing, something I love to do, and yet I want to do anything else but this. Fear is creeping in. Is anyone going to be bold enough to use this? Will they even like it? I don’t know how to create a fire effect or smoke. Will people think this is tacky? Why is a public domain picture of Athaliah so hard to find? All of this is called resistance.

If you haven’t watched my dragon video yet, let me give you the cliff-notes right now. (If you want to go a lot more in depth, it packs a lot of info, and I give you even more in the 4 page pdf that comes with the download.) The video is about the missing piece in our nativity scenes. Not the angels, or shepherds, wise men, or even Joseph. According to Revelation 12 a large Red Dragon was present there in Bethlehem, trying to destroy the child. This is something he been trying to do ever since Genesis 3. He is identified as Satan, the ancient serpent in verse 9. The video chronicles many times throughout scripture that he attempts to undo God’s promise, but is unsuccessful.

I am making a video about our enemy, exposing him for what he is. My wife told me that he probably didn’t want me making this video. That was some of the push-back, the wanting to give up, the self-doubting, the procrastination. In Gary Molander’s new book (I interviewed him in the last edition) he has a section on creative blocks and resistance. On pgs 80-82 he gives it a name. Satan. Interestingly enough, he even quotes Revelation 12, the very passage I was to be animating. Gary writes, “The most important line is the last one – the one that says that Satan is coming after Christ-followers with a rage and with vengeance. You hurt a Father most by harming His children.” I tweeted Gary and he and others actually prayed for me that day. In two days of hard work, the video was done. If you expect resistance, you can counter it. In your next project think “outside”.

Darrell Evans Interview

September 27, 2011 Leave a comment

A year ago, I interviewed Darrell Evans on worship. I thought it’d be good to post it here now, especially since he just launched a kickstarter campaign for a new worship project. Darrell’s a great guy, and his thoughts on worship and the Christian life were so good, so let me share it with you now:

click here: DARRELL EVANS INTERVIEW mp3

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Here’s a new song that will be on the new album (live from our church):

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Last, but not least, consider pledging to Darrell’s kickstarter campaign. You can help make this project a reality, and get a CD as a benefit. What’s not to like about that? Find out more for yourself right here:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/973917838/join-darrell-in-the-awesome-god-is-he-worship-proj?ref=live

My Revelation-like letter to the American Church

Today in my Sunday School lesson we took a look at Jesus’ letters to the 7 churches in Revelation 2-3. We noticed that they follow a certain pattern. The pattern includes:

1) a description of Jesus (taken from Chapter 1)

2) a section headed “I know,” introducing praise for what is good about that church (except in the case of Laodicea).

3) a criticism of the church (not in the case of Smyrna or Philadelphia).

4) a warning or instruction

5) a promise to those who “overcome” (whose fulfillment we see in chapters 19-22).

As a class activity, I asked everyone to write their own letter using the same pattern. A letter to the church. We took a few minutes to do this. I had not ever done this before so I did as well. The submissions were very good and intriguing. I, as a minister, was a bit hesitant to assign this project to those who I serve, especially with the bit of “right your own rebuke of the church” in the letter. I don’t have theirs to post, but I do have my own that I wrote in the 5 to 10 minutes that we had allotted for this. I wrote it in Spanish, but I’ll translate here for you:

In the name of Jesus, the author and perfector of our faith, I congratulate you on your decision to follow Christ. That is the best possible decision that can be made. However, I have to tell you, because I love you in the Lord, that you must take more seriously the faith which you have confessed. In a country that is so blessed, you should as a church have a much greater impact, both locally and globally. The problem is that you are too interested in yourselves, and not interested enough in loving your neighbor as yourself. If you do not begin to live invested in the interest of your neighbor, both near and far, than you will not experience the full blessing and will not accomplish the purpose that God has for you. But those who humble themselves now, in this life, my God will exalt in the age to come, and in a way that goes beyond what you can even imagine.

I write this of course to myself as well. May God help us to surpass our own self-interest, and in humility serve others with Christ-likeness.

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