Home > Uncategorized > Quotes from a Great Book

Quotes from a Great Book

I’d like to highlight quotes from Gary Molander’s great book “Pursuing Christ, Creating Art”.  Go to garymo.com to find out how to order your own copy.

Art finds its truest purpose when its creator attempts to make visible the invisible. Love is an invisible concept. So is patience. So is forgiveness. In its purest form, art enables people to see love, to see patience, and to see forgiveness. The Christian artist then, takes that primary purpose, and adds one word to it. God. p. 19

The best art is borne in the joy of heaven, or the pain of hell. God-fearing artists will experience both, and God will beautifully interact with them in both places. But to create from Hades – to try to become artistically motivated from a place of perfect balance between heaven and hell – will cause artists to create safer art that is less impacting on the viewer, and frankly more boring. p. 41

Real freedom is the ability to tell God’s story with your unique voice. p. 56

If God is not crucifying fear in the hearts of artists, then He’s probably busy crucifying our pride. That’s the other side of the same coin. p. 78

Perfect is a myth…Our lives are excellent. But they’re not perfect. p. 83

Excellence requires that we take all of the ability given to us, and intersect that with all of the resources at our disposal. And we create from that exact intersection – Ability and Resources. p. 83

Don’t ever let personal obscurity stop you from creating art. Please don’t worry about becoming famous, or about making a name for yourself, or about maneuvering the spotlight to shine a little brighter on your face. It’s one thing to get your art as broadly distributed as possible (a good thing), and that’ll take a great strategy. But it’s another thing to make personal popularity the end game. Just continue to do the work. p. 89

I wish we’d all learn to find the sacredness, not in the result, but in the process. Let’s work our tails off at the process, making it our sacrament. But let’s learn, possibly for the first honest moment in our lives, to truly leave the results in the more-than-capable hands of Jesus. p. 98

Artists know that they’re crossed the line into idolatry when they attribute salvation to their art…It’s so easy to jump from God-worship to art-worship. p. 108

I think discontentment is a good thing. There is beauty in this sensation that something in our lives is not yet finished – that we need to write something, or read something, or pray something, or draw something, or paint something, or shoot something, or sing something. And rather than fight against it, I wish we’d learn to embrace it. p. 121

When artists and leaders begin to attach expectations to their dreams, they create nightmares. p. 123

These days, it’s easier than ever for any artist to create a platform for himself, for herself. But the size of the platform doesn’t always equal the size of the character. Platform only displays skill level, not heart condition. Beware of the artist whose skill level surpasses their character. p. 155

The mark of a real leader is never the absence of fear, but the willingness to hand their fears over to a God who is both good, and sovereign. One hundred times every day. p. 157

But my greatest hope in all of this is simple. I hope and pray that you go create some art. That you create it in response to God. That you create it so the world sees a God who is unseen. That you not worry about how widely it’s distributed. Just worry that it’s distributed somewhere. p. 158

That’s just the tip of the iceberg, folks. Seriously, buy the book! In case you missed my other post, here’s my conversation with GaryMo himself on this fine work:

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: